Since the early days of the Palmach, the cultural, educational and information activities were made a priority in the daily work of the Palmach HQ and its units. The HQ people aspired to foster an esprit de corps among Palmach members, strengthen the ideological cognitive content of the warriors on all levels, in order to increase their loyalty to the voluntary underground organization.

Since the early days of the Palmach, the cultural, educational and information activities were made a priority in the daily work of the Palmach HQ and its units. The HQ people aspired to foster an esprit de corps among Palmach members; strengthen the ideological cognitive content of the warriors on all levels, in order to increase their loyalty to the voluntary underground organization. The exemplary image that stood before the Palmach commanders, was that of an educated warrior who had insight and was resourceful; a person who knew and was familiar with the reasons and goals behind his recruitment, and would make independent decisions when necessary. The commanders, who believed in the educative power of the cultural-informative activity, dedicated the time, effort and necessary resources. Apart from nurturing the individual soldier, they sought to strengthen the social framework of the unit (the platoon, squad, battalion and brigade), using unique and distinctive folklore models. The cultural-informative activity was also enlisted for that purpose.
The main information tool was the Palmach magazine. The magazine editor was one of the Palmach HQ members since its inception, and the HQ approaches received a notable spot in the magazine. The magazine was generally rich in content in the educational-ideological area as well as the military and political ones. The magazine also gave voice to the soldiers: Dilemmas, milieu, operation reports, humor, etc. Aside from the Palmach magazine, unit magazines were also published, such as: squad magazines, special units magazine (such as, "Davar La'almonim" about the Mistaarvim (Fighters disguised as Arabs)) and brigade magazines. When the youth movements' settlement groups joined the Palmach, the Hachsharot also published their own magazines.
From 1943, an information officer was added to the HQ. The information work was done by a national staff of information officers, who were mostly commanders with a military training that were part of the units' commanding staff.
Unit gatherings were held every so often, especially the general gathering of Palmach members, which took place three times throughout the existence of the Palmach, set the stage for information and cultural activists.
Different frame works were held during the on-going activity: A. Cultural committees in all units.
B. Preparing future information officers. C. Cultural-educational activity in all the professional and command courses and units. D. Educational activity in general-national frameworks such as, a basic education course for uneducated recruits, an education course for commanders ("The Clever's course"), and a professional instructors' course in subjects like: Community singing and geography.
The Palmach adopted symbols and rituals that were prevalent among the pioneering youth movements, such as: Gathering around the bonfire with the Finjan (small metal pot for making coffee) and Chizbat "ritual," touring around the country, lack of military formality all these contributed to the sense of uniqueness of Palmach members, their esprit de corps and warriors' brotherhood.


Cultural Educational Goals
Palmach - Information
Palmach Culture
The Palmach Anthem
The Palmach Emblem and Flag

Information Archive
The Beginning of the Palmach
Struggle against the British
The War of Independence
Dismantling of the Palmach
Palmach and the Settlements
The Palmach's Military Thinking
Units and Organizational Structure
Female Palmach Members
Culture and Folklore
Palmach Contribution and Legacy